Golden Age of the Silver Screen

Song of the South (1946)

Episode #21

RKO Radio Pictures released Song of the South on November 20, 1946. Harve Foster and Wilfred Jackson directed the film starring Ruth Warrick, Bobby Driscoll, and James Baskett.

‘Song of the South’ Plot Summary

In this extremely controversial, but Academy Award winning film, young Johnny and his mother are sent to live on his grandmother’s plantation in the deep South some time after the American Civil War while his father remains in Atlanta. Once there, Johnny befriends Uncle Remus, one of the African American men living on the plantation, who helps guide him through life with his colorful stories about Br’er Rabbit, Br’er Fox, and Br’er Bear and their adventures in the woods near the Briar Patch.

Read the full summary.

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This podcast is intended for entertainment and information purposes only. The song Hyperfun is brought to you by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.com under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. All original content of this podcast is the intellectual property of the Golden Age of the Silver Screen, the MHM Podcast Network, and Fuzzy Bunny Slippers Entertainment LLC unless otherwise noted.

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RKO Radio Pictures released Song of the South on November 20, 1946. Harve Foster and Wilfred Jackson directed the film starring Ruth Warrick, Bobby Driscoll, and James Baskett.

User Rating: 0.94 ( 5 votes)
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2 Comments

  1. This movie should be three stars. It is an important part of the Disney canon due mostly to its cultural relevance. I watched it with my children and had an essential conversation with them about the historicity of the movie, who Uncle Remus was, as well as about the Civil War, Reconstruction and race, We cannot afford to dismiss movies of classic Hollywood-era just because we don’t like their themes. Cancellation culture runs the threat of repeating the mistakes of the past. We need to confront rascism and not allow people with good intentions peddle their own intolerance and bigotry.

    1. Thanks for the response, Matt. I applaud you for discussing the subject matter with your children. That was one of our talking points and I think the most important thing Disney has been missing with S.O.T.S. I DO hope they release it on DVD before 2039 – with prominent education from members of all races/backgrounds. Educating the public on the subject matter is better than putting our collective heads in the sand and pretend it didn’t/doesn’t exist. Uncle Remus is a very sweet character and definitely a hero in my eyes. However, everyone is entitled to their opinion on movies. The older the movie, the stronger the opinions I’m gathering. :-) But our trio of podcasters have to disagree on the three stars after watching it again… Boring. It’s better than the half-star Chris gave it, but then again, he loves “Buckaroo Banzai” and I don’t get the appeal of that movie so there’s that. ;-) Hope you have a wonderful week. Stay safe during Covid-19!!!

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