Movie House Memories

The Last of the Mohicans (1992)

Episode #179

20th Century Fox released The Last of the Mohicans on September 25, 1992. Michael Mann directed the film starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Madeleine Stowe, and Russell Means.

‘The Last of the Mohicans’ 30-Second Summary

In the 18th Century, British and French soldiers battle for control of North American colonies. As settlers and native Americans take sides, the last of the Mohicans saves and adopts an orphaned settler they name Hawkeye. In time, that boy will save a woman named Cora and her sister Alice after they find themselves in a heap of trouble.

Read the full summary.

Buy the Film

Last Of The Mohicans Blu Ray Director's Definitive Cut

$15.57
$11.92
 in stock
8 new from $11.92
2 used from $9.99
Free shipping
Amazon.com
as of May 22, 2022 10:03 pm
*As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.

Leave a Comment and Follow Us

Please let us know what you think of the film in the comments section, and rate this movie from one to five stars below as well. If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe to our YouTube channel for all of our film reviews.

Disclaimer
This podcast is intended for entertainment and information purposes only. The theme music for Movie House Memories, Hiding Your Reality, is brought to you by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.com under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. All original content of this podcast is the intellectual property of Movie House Memories, the MHM Podcast Network, and Fuzzy Bunny Slippers Entertainment LLC. unless otherwise noted.

Rate the Film!

Our Rating

Our Rating

20th Century Fox released The Last of the Mohicans on September 25, 1992. Michael Mann directed the film starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Madeleine Stowe, and Russell Means.

User Rating: Be the first one !
Show More

One Comment

  1. Wow, Out of the Past! Shame Chris can’t join that one. I like Mohicans quite a bit, flawed as it is. Wes Studi is amazing, but the romance and dialogue is about as cheesy as it can get (but the source material – and the 1936 version – is also pretty cheesy – maybe they could have tried to be less faithful to it). Also I didn’t really feel much chemistry between Lewis and Stowe. As far as awards, I don’t think the film was successful or critically acclaimed(don’t recall it being on many top 10 lists) enough for it to get Studi a nom, which is unfortunate(and as much as people roll their eyes at Hollywood being woke today at least today someone like Studi would have a much better chance to get into that club, while in 1993 it would be pretty tough – though Jaye Davidson getting nominated that year was sort of groundbreaking)

Back to top button