Lunchtime Movie Review

Working Girl (1988)

Episode #130

Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation released Working Girl on December 21, 1988. Mike Nichols directed the film starring Melanie Griffith, Harrison Ford, and Sigourney Weaver.

‘Working Girl’ Movie Summary

Tess McGill is a frustrated secretary, struggling to make her place in the world of big business in New York City. However, she gets her chance when her boss breaks her leg on a skiing holiday. McGill takes advantage of her new-found position when she teams up with investment broker, Jack Trainer, to work on a big deal. The situation gets complicated when her boss returns.

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This podcast is intended for entertainment and information purposes only. The theme music for Lunchtime Movie Review, Fireworks is provided courtesy of Alexander Nakarada at serpentsoundstudios.com under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. All original content of this podcast is the intellectual property of Lunchtime Movie Review, the MHM Podcast Network, and Fuzzy Bunny Slippers Entertainment LLC unless otherwise noted.

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Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation released Working Girl on December 21, 1988. Mike Nichols directed the film starring Melanie Griffith, Harrison Ford, and Sigourney Weaver.

User Rating: 2.6 ( 1 votes)
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5 Comments

  1. Hi Patrick, I beg to differ, but I acknowledge your point that Tess was devious and her actions were not to be admired, however I think what you missed was the struggle of the lower class trying to break into the middle/privileged class (ie, Harvard, Yale college educated strata) and how her night school education was seen as a joke compared to theirs – this was the 80s and the era of high flyers – also what was highlighted was her family and friends seeing her as betraying her working class roots. Maybe I’ve seen this from a different point of view, that said I love listening to your podcasts, cheers A

  2. To add to my point, re the suggestion that this was about female empowerment, what if you substituted the female leads with make leads? It would be more of a struggle about the lower class trying to break into the privileged boys club I contend…

    1. Hi Angie
      The Secret of My Success is sort of this movie with male leads. a lot of 80s comedies seemed to be about class struggles(Working Girl also reminds me a little of Trading Places). Not sure this film is really just about female empowerment(I mean Katherine tries to prevent Tess’ ascent). The Next Picture Show just did a good podcast on this film.

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