Criterion Critics

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

Episode #8

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)Columbia Pictures released Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb to theaters on January 29, 1964. Stanley Kubrick directed the film starring Peter Sellers, George C. Scott, and Sterling Hayden.

‘Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb’ Criterion Summary

Stanley Kubrick’s painfully funny take on Cold War anxiety is one of the fiercest satires of human folly ever to come out of Hollywood. The matchless shape-shifter Peter Sellers plays three wildly different roles: Royal Air Force Captain Lionel Mandrake, timidly trying to stop a nuclear attack on the USSR ordered by an unbalanced general (Sterling Hayden); the ineffectual and perpetually dumbfounded U.S. President Merkin Muffley, who must deliver the very bad news to the Soviet premier; and the titular Strangelove himself, a wheelchair-bound presidential adviser with a Nazi past. Finding improbable hilarity in nearly every unimaginable scenario, Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is a subversive masterpiece that officially announced Kubrick as an unparalleled stylist and pitch-black ironist.



Special Features

  • Restored 4K digital transfer, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • Alternate 5.1 surround soundtrack, presented in DTS-HD Master Audio on the Blu-ray
  • New interviews with Stanley Kubrick scholars Mick Broderick and Rodney Hill; archivist Richard Daniels; cinematographer and camera innovator Joe Dunton; camera operator Kelvin Pike; and David George, son of Peter George, on whose novel Red Alert the film is based
  • Excerpts from a 1966 audio interview with Kubrick, conducted by physicist and author Jeremy Bernstein
  • Four short documentaries, about the making of the film, the sociopolitical climate of the period, the work of actor Peter Sellers, and the artistry of Kubrick
  • Interviews from 1963 with Sellers and actor George C. Scott
  • Excerpt from a 1980 interview with Sellers from NBC’s Today show
  • Trailers
  • PLUS: An essay by scholar David Bromwich and a 1994 article by screenwriter Terry Southern on the making of the film New cover by Eric Skillman

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Columbia Pictures released Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb to theaters on January 29, 1964. Stanley Kubrick directed the film starring Peter Sellers, George C. Scott, and Sterling Hayden.

User Rating: 4.6 ( 2 votes)
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