Criterion Critics

Rashômon (1950)

Episode #4

Rashômon (1950)Daiei Motion Picture Company released Rashomon to theaters on August 25, 1950. Akira Kurosawa directed the film which starred Toshirô Mifune, Machiko Kyô, and Masayuki Mori.

‘Rashômon’ Criterion Summary

A riveting psychological thriller that investigates the nature of truth and the meaning of justice, Rashomon is widely considered one of the greatest films ever made. Four people give different accounts of a man’s murder and the rape of his wife, which director Akira Kurosawa presents with striking imagery and an ingenious use of flashbacks. This eloquent masterwork and international sensation revolutionized film language and introduced Japanese cinema—and a commanding new star by the name of Toshiro Mifune—to the Western world.

read MHM’s full summary



Special Features

  • New digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • Audio commentary by Japanese-film historian Donald Richie
  • Interview with director Robert Altman about Rashomon
  • Excerpts from The World of Kazuo Miyagawa, a documentary on Rashomon’s cinematographer
  • A Testimony as an Image, a sixty-eight-minute documentary featuring interviews with cast and crew
  • Archival audio interview with actor Takashi Shimura
  • Original and rerelease trailers
  • Optional English-dubbed soundtrack
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by film historian Stephen Prince; an excerpt from director Akira Kurosawa’s Something Like an Autobiography; and reprints of Rashomon’s two source stories by Ryunosuke Akutagawa, “Rashomon” and “In a Grove”

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Daiei Motion Picture Company released Rashomon to theaters on August 25, 1950. Akira Kurosawa directed the film which starred Toshirô Mifune, Machiko Kyô, and Masayuki Mori.

User Rating: 4.83 ( 2 votes)
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4 Comments

  1. Bobby, I highly recommend High & Low and Ikiru. 2 great non samurai, contemporary films from Kurosawa. And mifune isn’t in Ikiru. It’s a beautiful film. High & Low is a seminal thriller. Mifune is pretty reserved in this, it’s nothing like his samurai performances. Both are on Eberts Greatest Movies and criterion.
    Looking forward to the Detour noirsville podcast, are you going to do it on Criterion Critics as well?

    1. FYI many of the older criterion titles(like this one) get new extras when they get new bluray/DVD releases. So I assume Bobby got the older DVD, not the reissue. This could happen again with future titles I’m guessing. I suggest going to the criterion site and typing in the title before you buy it somewhere else so you can see what extras the most current version has.

      1. Hi, Eddie. I have both those films in my collection already but haven’t watched either yet. Looking forward to Ikiru whenever we get to it for the podcast. Yes, sometimes I pick up the DVD because I enjoy watching the movies more than the BTS stuff in most cases and I’m not as picky about 4K quality for a 1920s film (like my Harold Lloyd comment where I already have the 2006 remaster) when all I want to do is watch the story so if I end up missing out on a commentary or two doesn’t hurt my feelings too bad – except for our podcasts. I grew up with a 19″ B&W TV with rabbit ears so everything is an upgrade in quality over that! DVDs are easier to come by online since I don’t live near stores selling Criterions off-the-shelf like Barnes and Noble – and my wife isn’t as angry as if I paid double for the BluRay. 😉 But Rashomon was a giant miss for me since I didn’t like it as much as the other guys I probably would have benefited from the extra BluRay BTS more than most to explain it further for my tiny brain. Sometimes it helps though when someone has a different version so we can all have an educated vantage point beyond another. In this case, I drew the short straw. Besides, I’m still not a Rashomon fan so it’s easier to dispose of when it isn’t an expensive BluRay. Lol 🙂

    2. I think Detour will show up on it at some point, but for now, just Noirsville. You see the remastered version yet? I know you said you missed the showing of it at the theater.

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